[AMRadio] BPL in Texas - from Houston Chronicle.com


Vince Wesa Werber ka1iic at prexar.com
Sun Nov 28 14:59:55 EST 2004


Time to work on that 'Carrier Current' project...  Build up your own computer 
link via the power lines...

The question I have for the BPL situation is how are they going to keep their 
own noise down so the BPL signal gets thru???  Up here in Maine the power 
lines ARE the noise floor...  and it can vary from +3 to 9 DB...

Is the signal FM or something???

oh well...

Even up here in the sticks we have our pick of the type of internet connection 
we might want...

73
vince
ka1iic



On Saturday 27 November 2004 06:06 pm, Keith Anderson wrote:
> BPL comes to Texas, Burnet is a small town located northwest of Austin,
> Texas' state capital.
>
>  http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/2919786
>
>  Nov. 26, 2004, 4:59PM
>
>
>   Texas town gets Net over power lines
>
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > Associated Press
> >
> > BURNET -- High-speed Internet service is coming to about 120 homes in
> > this town of 5,000 using a novel technology that connects residents to
> > the Web through power lines.
> >
> > Broadband Horizons, which provides Internet access to about 6,000
> > customers in rural parts of Central Texas, is paying most of the
> > estimated $50,000 cost to install a network in a neighborhood of
> > Burnet, about 40 miles northwest of Austin.
> >
> > Once the system is in place, scheduled by year end, they say that
> > houses will connect by plugging a simple modem device into a wall
> > socket.
> >
> > Companies have been trying to develop the technology -- called
> > broadband over power line, or BPL -- for nearly a decade, and now the
> > technology is being tested in a few places. The city-owned electric
> > utility in Manassas, Va., launched a pilot project last fall.
> > Ohio-based Cinergy Corp. is also testing a system.
> >
> > In theory, electric current runs along power lines at low frequencies
> > and doesn't interfere with Internet signals at much higher frequencies.
> > Advocates say the technology would be a cheaper way to wire rural towns
> > like Burnet.
> >
> > Bob McClung, a Blanco entrepreneur, believes he could provide broadband
> > service for about $30 a month with the cooperation of public and
> > private electric utilities. He told the Austin American-Statesman that
> > the technology could be much more common within a few years.
> >
> > Some analysts are skeptical, however, noting that cable television
> > operators and phone companies have a big head start in building
> > broadband networks.
> >
> > "There are 31 million subscribers to broadband in the U.S.," Bruce
> > Leichtman of Leichtman Research Group in Durham, N.H., told the Austin
> > American-Statesman. "We are well beyond the early-adopter stage. The
> > high-end of the market is pretty well plucked."
> >
> > Ken Graham, the mayor pro tem, who retired to Burnet in 1999 after
> > working in telecommunications, said he doesn't like his slow dial-up
> > connection to the Internet and views the broadband pilot as a good
> > thing.
> >
> > "This will enhance our quality of life, very definitely," Graham said.
> > "Most people that live in this subdivision are retired professionals.
> > They have moved to the small town, but they don't want to give up the
> > conveniences that they had."
> >
> >
> > Brought to you by the HoustonChronicle.com
>
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