[AMRadio] Re: Converting old 1.8-4.0 MHz AM Marine Radios


Kim Elmore Kim.Elmore at noaa.gov
Fri Sep 10 11:04:03 EDT 2004


My Dad had the First Class Radiotelephone license, before it was converted 
to the General.  He was a bit disappointed by that restructuring, as he was 
quite proud of that certificate.  I understand that earning it was a real 
bear, too.

The GROL is, well, weird. I was never sure exactly what it was aimed at. It 
has a little bit of tube stuff in it, not much.  A fair bit of digital 
stuff, some solid state and some basic AC circuit theory.  It asked a bit 
about aviation instrument landing systems. Since I'm also a pilot, none of 
that was totally foreign. It asked a fair bit about antennas and 
transmission lines, though that was all very easy. I saw nothing about 
programming, and nothing about surface mount.  The radar stuff was more 
fun, but still relatively basic stuff.  I've done a fair bit of research 
with weather radars (I'm a research meteorologist), so I knew the basics of 
that, too. Learning more of the details was fun, though.

The element for GMDSS Maintainer looks to be mainly trouble shooting and a 
bit more fun than the GROL, though it also contains some regulatory stuff 
that's unique to ships (naturally). Of course, that license certainly 
wouldn't be a very useful one to have in the middle of Oklahoma, unless sea 
level rises by about 900 ft or so...

Kim Elmore, N5OP

At 07:29 PM 9/9/2004, you wrote:
>God,
>I took the general radiotelephone operators test about 25 years ago
>(still have it), and it was loads of tube circuit trouble shooting
>questions,
>frequency allocations, antenna stuff.
>
>Both it and the general ham test were easy as stink, because
>I was actually interested in the stuff.
>
>Seems these days, its all totally pointless, they need to ask
>questions about IC chips, surface mount, software programming, etc.
>
>Most radio stuff these days is easier to program than a VCR.
>
>Brett
>N2DTS
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: amradio-bounces at mailman.qth.net
>[mailto:amradio-bounces at mailman.qth.net] On Behalf Of Kim Elmore
>Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2004 6:32 PM
>To: Discussion of AM Radio
>Subject: [AMRadio] Re: Converting old 1.8-4.0 MHz AM Marine Radios
>
>
>I don't have an answer for you, but this sparks a non-amateur boat-anchor
>question:
>
>I recently took (and passed) my Second Class radiotelegraph test. I did
>this simply because I wanted to, not because I ever expect to be a marine
>radio operator. And yes, the FCC still issues this otherwise dead license.
>I also passed the GROL with radar endorsement; I figured I might as well,
>while I'm at it.
>
>Because I'm a 20-wpm-Extra, I was grandfathered for the CW element (20 wpm
>plain text, 16 wpm coded ciphers). The written test was pretty arcane,
>asking how to adjust a bug (I used one for years, so I know), how to handle
>traffic (did that on CW nets, so I had a clue), lots of non-amateur
>Q-signals, some oddball abbreviations mainly for radio direction finding,
>and finally a surprising amount of stuff about *regenerative receivers.*
>
>Now, this last part got me to wondering: were regenerative receivers made
>and used commercially in shipboard service within living memory?  I know
>something about them only because my Dad (W5JHJ) and I built some when I
>was kid.  But, when were they produced commercially? And when were they
>used in commercial service? I can only guess that it was for a short time
>around the 1920's or so, but I may be way off. My Dad was amused by this,
>too.
>
>Anyone have any good answers?
>
>Kim Elmore, N5OP
>
>                            Kim Elmore, Ph.D.
>                         University of Oklahoma
>          Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies "All of
>weather is divided into three parts: Yes, No, and Maybe. The greatest of
>these is Maybe" The original Latin appears to be garbled.
>
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                           Kim Elmore, Ph.D.
                        University of Oklahoma
         Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies
"All of weather is divided into three parts: Yes, No, and Maybe. The
greatest of these is Maybe" The original Latin appears to be garbled.




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