From ranchorobbo at gmail.com Sat Jun 3 06:39:48 2017 From: ranchorobbo at gmail.com (Rob Atkinson) Date: Sat, 3 Jun 2017 05:39:48 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] cloth covered wire for sale Message-ID: https://swap.qth.com/view_ad.php?counter=1329908 https://swap.qth.com/view_ad.php?counter=1329907 Don't know seller. Someone in 6 land. Hope someone rescues this wire. Rob K5UJ From mjcal77 at yahoo.com Sat Jun 10 12:05:50 2017 From: mjcal77 at yahoo.com (CL in NC) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 16:05:50 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... References: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431.ref@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> Well, it appears that what the ARRL has failed to do so far, eliminate AM and vintage gear operation, may be eventually killed from another direction. With the demise of ICM, and with info that has come down the pike, at the present time, there is no source of crystals other than NOS or used, for the restoration or maintenance of vintage gear, especially sideband in the filtering and carrier osc areas, or any rig that uses a heterodyne setup for band switching. Even the beloved solid state rigs from Japan in wide use still will fall by the wayside. Rigs needing front panel style frequency setting crystals can go VFO or maybe even the little NE555 setable jobs you can get from China for a couple bucks with some circuit modifications. I guess I better get back on the Meissner Sig Shifter project. Charlie, W4MEC in NC From k4kyv at charter.net Sat Jun 10 13:40:31 2017 From: k4kyv at charter.net (Donald Chester) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 12:40:31 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... Message-ID: <003d01d2e210$a8416da0$f8c448e0$@charter.net> > With the demise of ICM, and with info that has come down the pike, at > the present time, there is no source of crystals other than NOS or > used, for the restoration or maintenance of vintage gear, especially > sideband in the filtering and carrier osc areas, or any rig that uses > a heterodyne setup for band switching. Even the beloved solid state > rigs from Japan in wide use still will fall by the wayside. Rigs > needing front panel style frequency setting crystals can go VFO or > maybe even the little NE555 setable jobs you can get from China for a > couple bucks with some circuit modifications. I guess I better get back on the Meissner Sig Shifter project. Or dig out the late 1920s / early 1930s era handbooks and read up on instructions on how to grind your own. Apparently you can now add amateur-band crystals to the list of items that have or soon will become near-unobtanium, the list that already includes high voltage electrolytic capacitors, transmitting and receiving tubes, carbon composition resistors, most RF coils, filament transformers, swinging and filter chokes, HV oil-filled caps, UTC LS- and similar quality audio transformers, thermocouple RF ammeters, wide-spaced air variable capacitors, oscilloscope CRTs, Collins mechanical filters, authentic D-104 crystal elements, etc. Forget about NOS and used amateur band crystals; they mysteriously disappeared from hamfest flea markets several years ago. You can find gobs of military crystals for frequencies outside the ham bands, but ham-band crystals have become all but non-existent. You might still run across a few at estate sales or ePay listings if you can find out about them before someone grabs them up. I'm glad I accumulated mine while they were still relatively plentiful. The demise of crystals will eventually curtail "vintage sideband" as well as classic AM gear. Maybe someone in China or Russia will start up a factory for making them. I'm not sure where AF4K gets the ones he uses to re-stuff FT-241s. https://www.electronics-tutorials.com/oscillators/crystal-grinding.htm Don k4kyv --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus From navy.radio at gmail.com Sat Jun 10 13:57:21 2017 From: navy.radio at gmail.com (Nick England) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 13:57:21 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <003d01d2e210$a8416da0$f8c448e0$@charter.net> References: <003d01d2e210$a8416da0$f8c448e0$@charter.net> Message-ID: You can't believe how much crystals improve your high-end sound system - they provide startling improvements in soundstage and presence. Speaker wire that has been broken in using crystal oscillators sounds much cleaner than wire broken in using any other source. Analog crystals of course, digital crystal oscillators just make my ears bleed. And for the guitar people - you wouldn't believe the wonderful vintage tone you get by using vintage crystals. Way better than using old bumblebee caps.... Spread the word and the factories should re-open within a few weeks...... Nick On Sat, Jun 10, 2017 at 1:40 PM, Donald Chester wrote: > .... > The demise of crystals will eventually curtail "vintage sideband" as well > as > classic AM gear. Maybe someone in China or Russia will start up a factory > for making them. .... > > Don k4kyv > > From k4kyv at charter.net Sat Jun 10 14:02:25 2017 From: k4kyv at charter.net (Donald Chester) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 13:02:25 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: References: <003d01d2e210$a8416da0$f8c448e0$@charter.net> Message-ID: <000201d2e213$b7be6550$273b2ff0$@charter.net> Be sure to specify frequency ranges that include the amateur bands and popular frequencies like the oscillator crystals in the 75A-4, Drake and similar receivers. Don k4kyv From: Nick England [mailto:navy.radio at gmail.com] Re: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... You can't believe how much crystals improve your high-end sound system - they provide startling improvements in soundstage and presence. Speaker wire that has been broken in using crystal oscillators sounds much cleaner than wire broken in using any other source. Analog crystals of course, digital crystal oscillators just make my ears bleed. And for the guitar people - you wouldn't believe the wonderful vintage tone you get by using vintage crystals. Way better than using old bumblebee caps.... Spread the word and the factories should re-open within a few weeks...... Nick --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus From jcandela at prodigy.net Sat Jun 10 15:28:39 2017 From: jcandela at prodigy.net (=?utf-8?B?amNhbmRlbGFAcHJvZGlneS5uZXQ=?=) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 19:28:39 GMT Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... Message-ID: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> Look at qrp-labs product called progrock: https://www.qrp-labs.com/progrock.html Not exactly plug and play, but a workable solution to many applications where you need a stable frequency source. They offer filters to make sine wave output. JimWd5JKO Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE device ------ Original message------From: Donald ChesterDate: Sat, Jun 10, 2017 1:02 PMTo: 'Nick England';Cc: 'Discussion of AM Radio in the Amateur Service';Subject:Re: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... Be sure to specify frequency ranges that include the amateur bands and popular frequencies like the oscillator crystals in the 75A-4, Drake and similar receivers. Don k4kyv From: Nick England [mailto:navy.radio at gmail.com] Re: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... You can't believe how much crystals improve your high-end sound system - they provide startling improvements in soundstage and presence. Speaker wire that has been broken in using crystal oscillators sounds much cleaner than wire broken in using any other source. Analog crystals of course, digital crystal oscillators just make my ears bleed.And for the guitar people - you wouldn't believe the wonderful vintage tone you get by using vintage crystals. Way better than using old bumblebee caps....Spread the word and the factories should re-open within a few weeks......Nick---This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.https://www.avast.com/antivirus______________________________________________________________Our Main Website: http://www.amfone.netAMRadio mailing listArchives: http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/amradio/List Rules (must read!): http://w5ami.net/amradiofaq.htmlList Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/amradioPost: AMRadio at mailman.qth.netTo unsubscribe, send an email to amradio-request at mailman.qth.net withthe word unsubscribe in the message body.This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.netPlease help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.htmlMessage delivered to jcandela at prodigy.net From donroden at hiwaay.net Sat Jun 10 16:07:15 2017 From: donroden at hiwaay.net (donroden at hiwaay.net) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:07:15 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> References: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431.ref@mail.yahoo.com> <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <20170610150715.Horde.dp4r2ZG8fT7H-49MC4hJiR-@webmail.hiwaay.net> I'm surprised and a little disappointed that JAN or ICM didn't reach out to the Ham community ( or maybe the other way around ) and broker a deal where a ham club could have take over the crystal grinding operation. That would have been a great second hobby for ham retirees that are not yet ready to become irrelevant. Hopefully........... where there is a void, someone will fill it. A small Chinese sweatshop may become an industry giant in the future. Don W4DNR DonR From ranchorobbo at gmail.com Sat Jun 10 16:10:52 2017 From: ranchorobbo at gmail.com (Rob Atkinson) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:10:52 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> References: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> Message-ID: On Sat, Jun 10, 2017 at 2:28 PM, jcandela at prodigy.net wrote: > Look at qrp-labs product called progrock: > https://www.qrp-labs.com/progrock.html > > Not exactly plug and play, but a workable solution to many applications where you need a stable frequency source. > They offer filters to make sine wave output. That's nice I guess, unless you want to operate on 160 m. It's just kind of sad that to get what used to be a rock you'd plug into a socket, now you have to spend $18 and use a lot of circuitry plus a filter. What was that saying David Stinson posted a few weeks ago, something like "progress" means moving from simple and reliable to complex and unreliable. 73 Rob K5UJ From dave at W5QWX.com Sat Jun 10 16:12:41 2017 From: dave at W5QWX.com (Dave W5QWX) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:12:41 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do Message-ID: <8CC5792E3E40408CB199F9318784406A@DavidPC> Well fellows, guess the rocks I still have and have had since 57 can go to a museum someday when I?m SK. A ham in Spain and myself have been working on replacements for the VCO and PLL crystals in the old FT-ONE. The replacement uses the same little board from QRP Labs. It is the SiS5351A, and can replace three crystals with one board. Like someone else said it is ?not plug and play? but is really a neat replacement when nothing else is available. We are using an Arduino Nano board to program and run the SiS5351A. Both boards are not much larger than a couple of FT-241 holders. If any of you, find yourself needing a crystal and can not find one, you should consider the SiS5351A, and it available at other than QRP Labs. Don?t forget the non-oxygen wire to go along with the crystals for batter sound too! 73, Dave de W5QWX From kenw8ek at gmail.com Sat Jun 10 16:14:28 2017 From: kenw8ek at gmail.com (Ken, W8EK) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 16:14:28 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] Digital interfaces and related items FS Message-ID: <6624f36e-bb88-de24-e546-483d03a4b822@gmail.com> Digital Interfaces and related items For Sale: . . IMPORTANT NOTE: I have included a complete set of cables with these units. Many people selling these units do not include cables, or only partial cables. This is an important difference! In many cases the cables are worth about $50. . . West Mountain RIGblasters: The RIGblaster is an interface that can be used in all digital modes. It connects between the sound card of your computer, and your transceiver. It is optimized to eliminate ground loops, and make digital operation easier. In addition to the unit itself and the wall wart power supply, it includes a lot of extra cables, including two cables from the computer sound card to the unit (one each for audio in and out), a cable from the computer to the unit, as well as the radio cable. A manual is also included, along with a CD with a lot of digital programs and other digital info on it. I have two different RIGblaster models available: RIGblaster M8 This model is the one that has a round 8 pin mic connector on the front (along with switches and LEDs). It has a cable that also has a round 8 pin mic connector on it that can be internally programmed to interface with most any rig. It is presently wired for an Icom IC-746, which really means most any Icom rig with round 8 pin mic connector. This one works fine and looks close to new. Only $50. RIGblaster Plus Similar to the M8 model (above), but the RIGblaster "Plus" model additionally features true keyed Morse and true FSK RTTY. It also has a headphones jack on the front panel. This one works fine and looks close to new. The stick on feet have not been installed, nor have the enclosure screws, which is the way West Mountain ships the units, so it might be new. The original box is not included, however. $60 . . AEA/Timewave PK-232 DSP Digital Controller: The AEA PK-232 has long been the standard which others have been compared. It is a multimode controller, and does not require the use of your sound card in your computer to work in most all digital modes. This unit was originally a PK-232, but has had the DSP upgrade making it even more useful. It is now capable of the following modes: RTTY-Baudot RTTY-ASCII PACTOR Packet 300 bps HF Packet 1200 bps VHF Morse FAX HF AMTOR SITOR NAVTEX TDM The DSP adds even sharper filters than the original. Features include Digital Signal Processor 16 Bit A/D-D/A 18 DSP Filters Twin Peak RTTY Filters Adaptive PACTOR filters 100 Hz CW Filter Automatic Operation All standard modes More info at http://www.timewave.com/support/PK-232/PK232DSP.html This unit works fine and looks really great. It includes cables to the computer, two radio (mic) cables, two receive audio cables, connector for scope, and power cord. There is a CD that includes a very detailed manual, plus other digital information. Buy all of this for only $250. . . Extra Cables for use with AEA PK-232 Digital Controller: The AEA PK-232 uses a sort of odd five pin inline plastic connector. All of these cables have that connector on one end, complete with shrink tubing, and are original AEA. PK-232 to Icom 24 pin accessory plug This 24 pin plug is used on rigs like the IC-751 plus many others. It permits one to plug into the back of the rig. Both of these connectors are somewhat rare. $20 PK-232 to Kenwood round 8 pin The 5 pin plug on one end, and a round 8 pin mic plug on the other, wired for Kenwood. $15 PK-232 to unterminated cable The 5 pin plug on one end, and nothing on the other end, permitting one to add their own connector. $10 . . Tigertronics Signal Link SL-1: The Tigertronics SignaLink lets you operate all of today?s most popular digital modes without having to purchase an expensive multimode controller. The SignaLink bridges the gap between your computer?s sound card and your radio to provide instant compatibility with a multitude of sophisticated communications programs. Programs are available for every imaginable mode including PSK-31, MT63, RTTY, SSTV, APRS, and Packet. More than 80 programs are available through the Tigertronics web site and many more can be found by searching the Internet software archives. This one has been set up to work with an Icom IC-706 transceiver (which of course covers from 160 m up thru 440 MHz, so is great for both HF and VHF use). It has a modular mic connector which should work with most of the Icom rigs using modular connectors. Included with this unit is the radio cable, two audio cables (audio in and audio out), a power cord, paper manual, and a CD with manual and a variety of additional information. Get all of this for only $40. . . Cable for Icom Transceiver to Digital Controller: The package says "The Country Ham RTC2-Ic", TNC-Radio Cable w/ DIN and Mike Plug. For use with MFJ, AEA, and PacComm TNCs using a 5 pin DIN plug. The opposite end has a round Icom 8 pin connector as used on most Icom rigs. Pin outs are listed on the label. There is also an attached cable with 1/8 inch plug to go to the speaker jack. This cable is apparently new, still in its original bag. $12 . . . I also have many other accessories available such as many different types of microphones, HTs, VHF and UHF rigs, HF and VHF/UHF antennas, connectors, miscellaneous accessories, etc. Just too many to list here. Please e-mail your requests. . Prices do not include shipping from Florida. Thanks. 73, Ken, W8EK Ken Simpson E-mail to W8EK at FLHam.net or W8EK at arrl.net Voice Phone (352) 732-8400 . From ranchorobbo at gmail.com Sat Jun 10 16:20:52 2017 From: ranchorobbo at gmail.com (Rob Atkinson) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:20:52 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <20170610150715.Horde.dp4r2ZG8fT7H-49MC4hJiR-@webmail.hiwaay.net> References: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431.ref@mail.yahoo.com> <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> <20170610150715.Horde.dp4r2ZG8fT7H-49MC4hJiR-@webmail.hiwaay.net> Message-ID: In ER#2 Leo Meyerson recalls his crystal manufacturing company during WW2. When the US got in the war, ham radio stopped, and so did Leo's fledgling World Radio Labs. He had to do something and heard the military needed crystals. He and another guy who knew how to grind and had a homemade lapping machine made from a drill press, managed to get an order to make some samples for the Signal Corps. They worked day and night for 3 days, and got the rocks ground and drove all night from Council Bluffs Iowa to Chicago where they turned them in to a man at Motorola who was supposed to evaluate them. They had to wait around for a few hours but at 2 p.m. this guy came out and told them they passed the specification tests and gave them an order for 80,000 crystals at over $8 each. Leo and his partner went back to Council Bluffs and started hiring, set up a factory, got a bunch of lapping machines and with war time deferments, spent the whole war years making crystals. They developed ways of getting the rocks in on frequency while still on the grinder, and passed this on to other contractors. At the height of productivity they had a payroll of 500 people. When the war ended, Leo wanted to get back into selling transmitters so his partner continued the crystal business through the Korean conflict and after that sold it to TRW. Rob K5UJ On Sat, Jun 10, 2017 at 3:07 PM, wrote: > I'm surprised and a little disappointed that JAN or ICM didn't reach out to > the Ham community ( or maybe the other way around ) and broker a deal where > a ham club could have take over the crystal grinding operation. That would > have been a great second hobby for ham retirees that are not yet ready to > become irrelevant. > > Hopefully........... where there is a void, someone will fill it. > A small Chinese sweatshop may become an industry giant in the future. > > Don W4DNR From ranickel at comcast.net Sat Jun 10 17:23:05 2017 From: ranickel at comcast.net (Robert Nickels) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 16:23:05 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: References: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> Message-ID: <51169022-63f0-3c41-38b8-8c8c233ce399@comcast.net> Hams have traditionally led the way in applying new technologies. I enjoy building and experimenting with RF devices and have long abandoned quartz crystals for which there is a rapidly diminishing demand in the world, in favor of modern equivalents. After the news about International Crystal came out, I have made one - based on programmable oscillators made by Epson - available to others on a limited basis. http://www.rantechnology.com/four-channel-oscillator-board.html For more information please contact me by private email. 73, Bob W9RAN From wb4aeg at zoho.com Sat Jun 10 17:25:06 2017 From: wb4aeg at zoho.com (Hal Dale) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 17:25:06 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <51169022-63f0-3c41-38b8-8c8c233ce399@comcast.net> References: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> <51169022-63f0-3c41-38b8-8c8c233ce399@comcast.net> Message-ID: <15c93e56f6f.12ab2359734824.1829936166500905576@zoho.com> Here's the problem with this.....SIZE....over Sent using Zoho Mail ---- On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 17:23:05 -0400 Robert Nickels <ranickel at comcast.net> wrote ---- Hams have traditionally led the way in applying new technologies. I enjoy building and experimenting with RF devices and have long abandoned quartz crystals for which there is a rapidly diminishing demand in the world, in favor of modern equivalents. After the news about International Crystal came out, I have made one - based on programmable oscillators made by Epson - available to others on a limited basis. http://www.rantechnology.com/four-channel-oscillator-board.html For more information please contact me by private email. 73, Bob W9RAN ______________________________________________________________ Our Main Website: http://www.amfone.net AMRadio mailing list Archives: http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/amradio/ List Rules (must read!): http://w5ami.net/amradiofaq.html List Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/amradio Post: AMRadio at mailman.qth.net To unsubscribe, send an email to amradio-request at mailman.qth.net with the word unsubscribe in the message body. This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html Message delivered to wb4aeg at zoho.com From mjcal77 at yahoo.com Sat Jun 10 17:27:31 2017 From: mjcal77 at yahoo.com (CL in NC) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 21:27:31 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] Another simpler crystal substitute? References: <160185883.8313711.1497130051165.ref@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <160185883.8313711.1497130051165@mail.yahoo.com> Other crystal sub? I was thinking this might be an option for crystals below 10MC, or at least worth a try. Unable to get any info out of the seller, guess if I spoke Chinese, I'd do better. There is probably a diagram and info somewhere to build it yourself. http://www.ebay.com/itm/251550906801?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT Additional info I have is that ICM has already sold off their equipment to other companies, and the hopes that perhaps some ICM folks would carry on as a cottage industry are dashed. Grinding your own is definitely one option, but when you read the books on making quality crystals for radio work, it is a bit more involved than a sheet of glass and some grinding compound. Another 'wonder what happened to them' is the automatic equipment that made tubes, yes, you can watch the quaint youtube video about the guy making one tube, but it is not a 6146 by any stretch. Did all the tube manufacturers just sell it all for scrap metal? Well, in hind sight, I wish I still had my '68 Dodge Charger, who would have guessed the car I sold for 800 bucks in 1976 would be a high dollar collectors item 40 years later? A little foresight a few years back, and somebody might still be making the odds and ends that still have a minor following. Charlie in NC From Foltarz at rocketmail.com Sat Jun 10 17:41:53 2017 From: Foltarz at rocketmail.com (Mark Foltarz) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 21:41:53 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> References: <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431.ref@mail.yahoo.com> <1800824164.8188048.1497110750431@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <2002926063.6995294.1497130913600@mail.yahoo.com> All three rocks in my BC-610 E were ground from other value surplus crystals.?I used 400 grit wet sandpaper instead of carborundum ?- making??the figure 8s on the wet paper.I would grind, rinse with water, dry and then test. Repeating the process until I got on frequency.It was not hard at all to do. de KA4JVYMark From: CL in NC via AMRadio To: amradio at mailman.qth.net Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 12:06 PM Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... Well, it appears that what the ARRL has failed to do so far, eliminate AM and vintage gear operation, may be eventually killed from another direction.? With the demise of ICM, and with info that has come down the pike, at the present time, there is no source of crystals other than NOS or used, for the restoration or maintenance of vintage gear, especially sideband in the filtering and carrier osc areas, or any rig that uses a heterodyne setup for band switching.? Even the beloved solid state rigs from Japan in wide use still will fall by the wayside.? Rigs needing front panel style frequency setting crystals can go VFO or maybe even the little NE555 setable jobs you can get from China for a couple bucks with some circuit modifications.? I guess I better get back on the Meissner Sig Shifter project. Charlie, W4MEC in NC ______________________________________________________________ Our Main Website: http://www.amfone.net AMRadio mailing list Archives: http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/amradio/ List Rules (must read!): http://w5ami.net/amradiofaq.html List Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/amradio Post: AMRadio at mailman.qth.net To unsubscribe, send an email to amradio-request at mailman.qth.net with the word unsubscribe in the message body. This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html Message delivered to foltarz at rocketmail.com From ranickel at comcast.net Sat Jun 10 18:05:25 2017 From: ranickel at comcast.net (Robert Nickels) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 17:05:25 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] What the ARRL failed to do.... In-Reply-To: <15c93e56f6f.12ab2359734824.1829936166500905576@zoho.com> References: <000f4242.22c19f6d0c14f6f2@prodigy.net> <51169022-63f0-3c41-38b8-8c8c233ce399@comcast.net> <15c93e56f6f.12ab2359734824.1829936166500905576@zoho.com> Message-ID: <4f844ed7-65e7-70ec-596d-1a931050ce2d@comcast.net> On 6/10/2017 4:25 PM, Hal Dale wrote: > Here's the problem with this.....SIZE....over Hal, I have an SMT version that puts two fixed frequencies into an area of 0.5 square inches, but most hams shudder whenever SMT is mentioned. I've fit the four-channel board into a number of radios, but obviously the available physical space varies. 73, Bob W9RAN From w5jv at hotmail.com Sat Jun 10 18:06:23 2017 From: w5jv at hotmail.com (Doug Hensley) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 22:06:23 +0000 Subject: [AMRadio] OT: Speaking of Cystals: Really need a 1770 kHZ FT-243 Message-ID: Speaking of Crystals, I really need a 1770 kHZ FT-243 for my Mackay 3007A receiver. The original equipment was a Petersen Type Z-1 made in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The crystal is used in an IF stage added to later units. SInce this falls in the 160 meter range, I assume everytime a ham saw the frequency, he pulled it out, stuck it in his pocket and then threw it in a crystal storage box somewhere. Seen lots of the receivers with this IF stage but none have crystals. Name your price if you have one. CHeers, Doug W5JV From tw1 at sbcglobal.net Sat Jun 10 18:35:05 2017 From: tw1 at sbcglobal.net (tw1) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 17:35:05 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] Amradio digest re: FT 243 crystals Message-ID: <764536.13666.bm@smtp112.sbc.mail.ne1.yahoo.com> FT 243 crystals and other types can still be bought new, and ground to your needs through Brian Carling AF4k.AF4K.com I believe. Sorry if you all already knew that. I just bought several in the 75 m AM range. Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device From tw1 at sbcglobal.net Sat Jun 10 19:04:01 2017 From: tw1 at sbcglobal.net (tw1) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 2017 18:04:01 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] Re FT 234 Message-ID: <910834.81985.bm@smtp118.sbc.mail.ne1.yahoo.com> Did not know this than you for the info. Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device From K4TQF at yahoo.com Sun Jun 11 00:58:28 2017 From: K4TQF at yahoo.com (Mike Durff) Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2017 04:58:28 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] I wonder what happened to them References: <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209.ref@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209@mail.yahoo.com> Charlie in NC said:"... Another 'wonder what happened to them' is the automatic equipment that made tubes..."? Charlie & others: Around 1993, I found myself driving back to Memphis from Chicago. I had driven to Chicago to pick up a couple of AMPEX AG-440 two track tape machines. I called MPD in Owensboro, Kentucky and asked if I could stop by for a tour of their tube production facilities. They put me through to the former supervisor of that department. He said " ... oh that production line closed earlier in the year..." . My response was that this news made my visit more urgent as this was the last operating large scale tube production facility in the US. He agreed, and I stopped by on the way back to Memphis.?MPD was the Microwave Products Division of GE who had taken over the facility from the old Ken-Rad tube manufacturing company ( Kentucky Radio ). When I arrived, I saw that it was a "secure" facility. They were making classified microwave products for the US DOD. The visit was very secretive at the time. I had to produce an ID and get a visitors badge. ?I was told not to look from side to side as we walked thru the facility up to the 2nd floor where the tube department was located. ? ?The tube manufacturing department had been closed only a few months and everything was still in place. There were 22 "Sealex" machines on the line. He showed me the assembly room where steel dies were used to form the plates and other internal parts. Most of this work was done by hand & by women. There were rows on rows of shelves with different tube numbers on the front of the cubby-holes that held the dies for the particular tube number. There were partially assembled tubes still on the workbenches, as if they were in production until the last workday.? I asked what was to become of all the dies and Sealex machines. He said that Richardson Electronics had paid GE something like $2.5 million for everything. He also said that they had plans for removing only 2 of the Sealex machines. One to use and one for spare parts. ?Everything else was to be destroyed. Very sad indeed.? As we were leaving, we stopped by his office. He presented me with one of the last tubes, a 6550, in a commemorative box. The last production had been a big run of 6550's for the military. On the MPD box there was a gold sticker on the side that reads: ? ? ? ? ? Ken-Rad, General Electric, MPD inc.?COMMERATING FINAL RECEIVING TUBE PRODUCTION? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?in? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?Owensboro, Kentucky? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 1922-1993 I'm glad I made that phone call.? Durff, K4TQF From ranchorobbo at gmail.com Sun Jun 11 14:28:25 2017 From: ranchorobbo at gmail.com (Rob Atkinson) Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2017 13:28:25 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] I wonder what happened to them In-Reply-To: <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209@mail.yahoo.com> References: <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209.ref@mail.yahoo.com> <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: That is quite a story Durff thanks very much. In ER#2, there is an interview by Bill KD0HG (SK) with Kenneth Richardson on the state of tubes. Now, that was 28 years ago but it is revealing and adds another piece in the story of where tube manufacturing went. We mourn the loss of tubes and justifiably so, but these people were businessmen in suits and ties making decisions based on sales in the millions and trying to compete with off shore labor costs--it was all a business to them, not much romance for the lit filaments like we have. 73 Rob K5UJ From ranickel at comcast.net Sun Jun 11 15:09:42 2017 From: ranickel at comcast.net (Robert Nickels) Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2017 14:09:42 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] I wonder what happened to them In-Reply-To: References: <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209.ref@mail.yahoo.com> <1515525083.7155080.1497157108209@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <024fcfb9-2690-5d0f-e0a3-0eff89608205@comcast.net> On 6/11/2017 1:28 PM, Rob Atkinson wrote: > trying to compete with off shore labor costs And transistors...and all the things they allowed to be created that people were willing to pay for. Had it not been for (dare I say it?) - audiophiles - and guitar players, we'd be fighting over a dwindling number of vacuum tubes. Instead we can buy newly manufactured tubes and everything required to make tube-based products, even though the number of varieties is much more limited and the products are often described in rather flamboyant terms! Here's what might be a partial list of companies currently producing tubes, several of which have been doing so for decades: https://www.amplifiedparts.com/tube-factories A longer and more detailed list can be seen here: http://theartofsound.net/forum/showthread.php?44432-State-of-the-Vacuum-Tube-Industry-2016 73, Bob W9RAN From K4TQF at yahoo.com Tue Jun 13 23:59:21 2017 From: K4TQF at yahoo.com (Mike Durff) Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2017 03:59:21 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] Looking for very old ER article, not available from ER. References: <1444767259.9445614.1497412761334.ref@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <1444767259.9445614.1497412761334@mail.yahoo.com> In ER#2, there is an?interview by Bill KD0HG (SK) with Kenneth Richardson on the state of?tubes. I am looking for a copy of this article. It is not available from ER, nor do I find it on the Internet. Apparently, it was published pre-internet. Thanks, Durff, K4TQF From mjcal77 at yahoo.com Wed Jun 14 12:11:57 2017 From: mjcal77 at yahoo.com (CL in NC) Date: Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:11:57 +0000 (UTC) Subject: [AMRadio] Micamold caps References: <1817894187.12035387.1497456717099.ref@mail.yahoo.com> Message-ID: <1817894187.12035387.1497456717099@mail.yahoo.com> Could someone confirm my interpretation of a Micamold 4 dot cap that has a black body, the dots are Brown, Black(actually no color just the body) and orange as a .01ufd? The 4th dot in the top right corner all by itself is yellow. Of course, they are all shorted, but the 3 that are green/black/orange which should be .05, I actually got a reading around .5, but it was failing the leak test too. The yellow dot in the corner is a mystery unless it indicates a 400 volt cap, but if that is the actual multiplier, then they would be .1 and .5 ufd caps. These caps are the same ones in the BC348 that masquerade as low value resistors. This is in a Boonton Type 185 receiver, and have been unable to locate a schematic or information for it anywhere. Charlie, W4MEC in NC From kenw8ek at gmail.com Mon Jun 19 20:05:22 2017 From: kenw8ek at gmail.com (Ken, W8EK) Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2017 20:05:22 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] HF Transceivers and related items FS Message-ID: <1cdaccd8-f6fc-62cf-16d5-6cddee012668@gmail.com> For Sale: HF Transceivers (or HF plus 6 m and 2 m and 440 MHz) and related items . . Yaesu FT-890 HF Transceivers: The Yaesu FT-890 transmits 160 to 10 meters, while the general coverage receiver tunes from 100 kHz to 30 MHz. Power output is 100 watts in CW, SSB, FM and 25 watts AM. It features IF Shift, IF Notch and 16-bit main CPU, and needs 13.8 VDC at 20 Amps. It is relatively small. About 9" x 4" x 10". Features: 160-10 meters IF Notch IF Shift Dual VFOs Noise Blanker Speech Compressor I have two units available. Both transmit and receive great and look good, with a few minor scratches. Both have narrow CW and AM filters, and include hand mic, manual, and power cord. The first unit does not have the optional antenna tuner. It has a minor problem in that the power switch is always on. Use the switch on your power supply, and all is fine. $375 The second does have the optional automatic antenna tuner. All works fine. $500 . . Icom IC-706 Mk II G, 160 m to 440 MHz transceiver: The 706 Series is one of the most popular transceivers in amateur radio history. The IC-706 Mark II G adds many new features and capabilities not found in the previous versions. The "G" is an all-mode transceiver providing 100 watts on HF/6 m, 50 watts on 2 m, and 20 watts on 440 MHz. It receives from 30 KHz to 199 MHz and 400 to 470 MHz. It has a removable front panel that allows control of all features. The UT-106 DSP module is standard. One or two optional filters may be added. Features: .03-199, 400-470 MHz Receive Alpha memories Preamp/ATT VFO A/B IF Shift Scanning S/RF Meter 100 Watts HF+6M, 50 Watts 2M, 20 Watts 440 100 Memories All band Multimode Removable head Mini Spectrum Scope Electronic Keyer This particular unit includes hand microphone, power cord, and manual in its original box. All looks and works great. Only $625. . . Mounting Brackets: MB-51 This is an odd mounting bracket that is not often found in ham circles. It can attach to a dash and swivel to most any direction. It has a screw to take "head mounts" such as the MB-63 for the IC-706. Basically it is an additional way to mount a remote head. It is chrome plated, and really looks great. $40 MB-62 Standard mobile mounting bracket for the IC-706, AT-180, IC-7000, IC-7100, and others. Still in its original box, complete with all hardware. $25 MB-63 Bracket to mount the control head of the IC-706 and maybe others. Still in its original box, complete with all hardware. $25 As above, but not in original box. $20 . . MFJ 949 E, HF Antenna Tuner: The MFJ-949 E gives you an antenna tuner that covers everything from 1.8 - 30 MHz, plus you get an antenna switch and a 4:1 balun! Even a dummy load is built in. It is rated at 300 Watts, but I would hold it to about 100 W. It has a cross needle meter that displays forward power, reflected power, and SWR simultaneously, with 30 or 300 watts full scale. The 8 position antenna switch lets you select 2 coax lines, random wire /balanced line or dummy load. It also has a switch for peak or average power measurements. It has a 12 position air wound inductor, 4:1 balun, and 1000 Volt capacitors. This particular unit works fine. Cosmetically it has no dents or dings, and looks good. The meter lamp works fine. The front panel is the new multicolored vinyl (Lexan??) that has no defects. These sell new in the $160 to $190 range. This one is very close to new, with paper work for only $100. . . Linear Amp Switching Cables for Kenwood Rigs: This cable goes from a Kenwood transceiver to a linear amplifier to switch the amp from transmit to receive. One end has a DIN connector, as is used with most Kenwood rigs. The other end has an RCA phono plug, as used by most linear amplifiers. Before using this cable, please check the switching capabilities of your transceiver, and the requirements of your amplifier. Cable for switching the T/R relay Only $15. Cable as above, but with ALC line in addition to T/R switching. $20 . . I also have many other accessories available such as many different types of microphones, HTs, VHF and UHF rigs, HF and VHF/UHF antennas, connectors, miscellaneous accessories, etc. Just too many to list here. Please e-mail your requests. Prices do not include shipping from Florida. Thanks. 73, Ken, W8EK Ken Simpson E-mail to W8EK at FLHam.net or W8EK at arrl.net Voice Phone (352) 732-8400 . From jayw5jay at gmail.com Tue Jun 20 20:59:54 2017 From: jayw5jay at gmail.com (Jay Bromley) Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2017 19:59:54 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] Rocks and Roll, crystal gear Message-ID: HI guys, I thought with all the recent banter of International Crystal closing down the below kit may be of interests to a few? Please direct all questions to Rex W1REX and not me. I am just the messenger and reposting this from another reflector. Looks like a fun kit! Thank you and 73 de w5jay/jay.. Gangue, Since my very first field trip in 9th grade Earth Science class where we visited a quarry and I picked up a beautiful piece of crystal clear quartz, I've been fascinated with rocks....and fossils! Quartz andgalena crystals have always been my favorites primarily because I was also into electronics and knew their hidden powers. To others, they were just rocks but to me they were the tools for communication. I never got to play with quartz but I did build a few crystal radios using galena crystals purchased from rock shops. It took a trip to Ozarkcon before I could actually find my own galena crystals... Enough history. We had another successful Buildathon at FDIM...with the usual glitches here and there. We had about 40 builders in the session and I believe everyone left the room with a working kit. This year's build was an integrated Crystal Oscillator & Frequency Counter combo specifically designed to aid in grinding FT-243 crystals. I managed to wipe out my work-in-progress frequency code in the middle of the night and couldn't get it back in shape. I did have a beta kit working great so we ended up borrowing the micro chip in that to verify everyone's completed kit sothat went fairly well. I had to spend a couple of weeks back home reviving the program and getting the remaining kinks out of it. I also taped a few videos to explain the kit build, calibration, mods etc.All the information about the kit is now up on my website. Everybody has received their care package now so I can start selling them off my website. In my Miscellaneous Parts department, there are listings for the other FT-243 items that I offer. Notably, I managed to talk a crystal supplier to make me some FT-243 quartz blanks! I now have factory fresh FT-243 blanks cut for 7015 and ready to grind up into more QRP friendly areas of the 40m band. If you need a REAL FT-243 crystal or socket for a REAL spy or vintage radio, I got 'em... and the means to move 'em! Crystal Oscillator/Frequency Counter kit: http://qrpme.com/?p=product&id=Q17 Rocks & Sockets: http://qrpme.com/?p=parts Rex W1REX From kjsorenson at gmail.com Thu Jun 22 10:52:25 2017 From: kjsorenson at gmail.com (Jim Sorenson) Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 10:52:25 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly need to make new spacers Message-ID: Gentlemen, ?I'm putting back into service a vintage amp that uses the Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly?. The plastic (?) coil spacers are long gone and I need to make new ones. I once saw a practical way to do this with smaller coils a while back, but lost the reference. Any ideas would be appreciated before I try and make a mess of it. On another note, the amp uses a National R175 RF choke, not the R175A. The R175 was designed before 15 meters came into being so the question of stray resonances for that band might be a concern. My 1942 Radio Amateur's Handbook show the National ad for this choke, which reads "The reactance is high throughout the 10 and 20 meter bands as well as 40, 80 and 160 meter bands. Inductance of 225 uh., distributed capacity 0.6 mmf., DC resistance 6 ohms, DC current 800 ma., voltage breakdown to base 12,500 volts." Is it time for a modern replacement? Many thanks, Jim W3BH Saxonburg, PA From amvictor at ncsu.edu Thu Jun 22 10:59:47 2017 From: amvictor at ncsu.edu (Alan Victor) Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 10:59:47 -0400 Subject: [AMRadio] Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly need to make new spacers In-Reply-To: References: Message-ID: Jim, I have both choke styles and measured both with a GDO for anti resonance via the shorted terminals. Indeed the 175 is problematic near the 15 meter band and the 175 A solves this issue. You can modify the 175 per rewinding the last top section and there are notes on this subject. Alan W4AMV On Thu, Jun 22, 2017 at 10:52 AM, Jim Sorenson wrote: > Gentlemen, > > ?I'm putting back into service a vintage amp that uses the > Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly?. The plastic (?) coil > spacers are long gone and I need to make new ones. I once saw a practical > way to do this with smaller coils a while back, but lost the reference. > > Any ideas would be appreciated before I try and make a mess of it. > > On another note, the amp uses a National R175 RF choke, not the R175A. The > R175 was designed before 15 meters came into being so the question of stray > resonances for that band might be a concern. My 1942 Radio Amateur's > Handbook show the National ad for this choke, which reads "The reactance is > high throughout the 10 and 20 meter bands as well as 40, 80 and 160 meter > bands. Inductance of 225 uh., distributed capacity 0.6 mmf., DC resistance > 6 ohms, DC current 800 ma., voltage breakdown to base 12,500 volts." > > Is it time for a modern replacement? > > Many thanks, > > Jim > W3BH > Saxonburg, PA > ______________________________________________________________ > Our Main Website: http://www.amfone.net > AMRadio mailing list > Archives: http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/amradio/ > List Rules (must read!): http://w5ami.net/amradiofaq.html > List Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/amradio > Post: AMRadio at mailman.qth.net > To unsubscribe, send an email to amradio-request at mailman.qth.net with > the word unsubscribe in the message body. > > This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net > Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html > Message delivered to amvictor at ncsu.edu From ron.k3pid at sbcglobal.net Thu Jun 22 14:53:49 2017 From: ron.k3pid at sbcglobal.net (Ron.K3PID) Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:53:49 -0500 Subject: [AMRadio] Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly need tomake new spacers In-Reply-To: References: Message-ID: Hi Jim, I had some luck with slightly smaller coils in the past by using some modeling clay to hold the coil in place then ran a heavy bead of hot melt adhesive lengthwise at 90 deg increments. Once the hot melt sets up the clay is removed and the coil holds it shape fairly well. Ron K3PID From amvictor at ncsu.edu Thu Jun 22 22:18:54 2017 From: amvictor at ncsu.edu (Alan Victor) Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:18:54 -0700 Subject: [AMRadio] Barker-and-Williamson-850A-tank-coil-assembly need tomake new spacers In-Reply-To: References: Message-ID: Jim, here are the instructions for modification of the TOP winding: Modify top section of 175 choke. Remove only top section of choke winding. Then wind exactly 1 inch of wire close wound followed by a 3/16 in gap. Pulling the wind up that 3/16 inch distance and then.... Wind 1 inch again to finish wire end to upper post. A remeasure of the anti resonant frequency pushes the choke capability out to 50 MHz or 6 meters. Alan On Thu, Jun 22, 2017 at 11:53 AM, Ron.K3PID wrote: > Hi Jim, I had some luck with slightly smaller coils in the past by using > some modeling clay to hold the coil in place then ran a heavy bead of hot > melt adhesive lengthwise at 90 deg increments. Once the hot melt sets up > the clay is removed and the coil holds it shape fairly well. > > Ron K3PID > > > > ______________________________________________________________ > Our Main Website: http://www.amfone.net > AMRadio mailing list > Archives: http://mailman.qth.net/pipermail/amradio/ > List Rules (must read!): http://w5ami.net/amradiofaq.html > List Home: http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/amradio > Post: AMRadio at mailman.qth.net > To unsubscribe, send an email to amradio-request at mailman.qth.net with > the word unsubscribe in the message body. > > This list hosted by: http://www.qsl.net > Please help support this email list: http://www.qsl.net/donate.html > Message delivered to amvictor at ncsu.edu >

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